Sugary Drink Can

Consumption data

Title Description Owner  Date
Australian Health Survey: Consumption of Sweetened Beverages

Summary of sweetened (sugar and artificial) beverage consumption in Australia by age and demographics.

  • In 2011–12, one-third of people (34%) consumed sugar-sweetened beverages on the day prior to the interview.
  • The proportion of people consuming sugar-sweetened beverages was higher for children aged 2–18 years (47%) than adults (31%).
  • Results from the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Nutrition and Physical Activity Survey (NATSINPAS) showed that in 2012–13, half (50%) of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people aged two years and over consumed sugar-sweetened beverages, compared with one-third of non-Indigenous people (34%).
Australian Bureau of Statistics 2011-12
 Australian Health Survey; Consumption of Added Sugars

Summary of usual intakes of added sugars, and types of foods and beverages contributing to added sugars. It also includes comparisons with the World Health Organisation (WHO) 2015 guideline on sugars consumption.

  • In 2011-12, Australians consumed an average of 60 grams of free sugars per day (equivalent to 14 teaspoons of white sugar).
  • Intakes of free sugars were highest among teenage males (aged 14-18 years), who consumed an average 92 grams per day. The top 10% of the 14-18 year old males were estimated to usually consume at least 160 grams (or 38 teaspoons) of free sugars per day.
  • Just over half of all Australians aged 2 years and over exceeded the WHO recommendation to limit energy from free sugars to less than 10% of dietary energy. 
  • Just over half (52%) of free sugars in the diet were consumed from beverages, with the leading beverages being soft drinks, electrolyte and energy drinks (19%), fruit and vegetable juices and drinks (13%) and cordial (4.9%).  
 Australian Bureau of Statistics

 2016 

Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Survey: Nutrition Results
  •  Almost two in five (37%) Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people consumed Soft drinks, and flavoured mineral wateron the day of survey.
  • Around half of 19-30 year old (50.5%) and 14-18 year old (47.7%) Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people consumed Soft drinks, and flavoured mineral water on the day of survey.
  • Non-alcoholic discretionary beverages provide 6.9% of energy in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples diets.

Australian Bureau of Statistics 

 2012-13
Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Survey: Consumption of Added Sugars, 2012-13 Summary of usual intakes of added sugars, and types of foods and beverages contributing to added sugars. It also includes comparisons with the World Health Organisation (WHO) 2015 guideline on sugars consumption.
  •  In 2012-13, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people 2 years and over consumed an average of 75 grams of free sugars per day (equivalent to 18 teaspoons of white sugar). 
  • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people derived an average of 14% of their daily energy from free sugars, exceeding the WHO recommendation that children and adults should limit their intake of free sugars to less than 10% of dietary energy.
  • Free sugars made the greatest contribution to energy intakes among older children and young adults. For example, teenage boys aged 14-18 years derived 18 per cent of their dietary energy from free sugars as they consumed the equivalent of 25 teaspoons (106 grams) of free sugars per day. This amount is equivalent to more than two and a half cans of soft drink. Women aged 19-30 years consumed 21 teaspoons (87 grams) of free sugars, which contributed 17 per cent to their total energy intake.
  • The majority (87%) of free sugars were consumed from energy dense, nutrient-poor ‘discretionary’ foods and beverages. Two thirds (67%) of all free sugars consumed by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people came from beverages, led by soft drinks, sports and energy drinks (28%), followed by fruit and vegetable juices and drinks (12%), cordials (9.5%), and sugars added to beverages such as tea and coffee (9.4%), alcoholic beverages (4.9%) and milk beverages (3.4%).
  • Intakes were higher for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people living in non-remote areas where the average consumption was 78 grams (18.5 teaspoons), around 3 teaspoons (12 grams) higher than people living in remote areas (65 grams or 15.5 teaspoons).
  • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people consumed 15 grams (almost 4 teaspoons) more free sugars on average than non-Indigenous people. Beverages were the most common source of free sugars for both populations, however Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people derived a higher proportion of free sugars from beverages than non-Indigenous people (67% compared with 51%).
Australian Bureau of Statistics  2016
Victorian Population Health Survey 2014

Phone survey of Victorian adults repeated every 2 years. It includes self-reported consumption of sweetened (sugar and artificial) beverages – frequency and amount. Data at LGA level is also presented.

  • 11.2% of Victorian adults consume sugar sweetened beverages daily. 30.7% of Victorian adults consumed sugar-sweetened soft drinks at least once a week.
Victorian Government, Department of Health and Human Services 2016
2013 LGA oral health profiles Daily soft drink consumption by LGA. Note: the profiles do not indicate whether soft drink consumption refers to sugar sweetened only or sugar sweetened + artificially sweetened. Dental Health Services Victoria 2013
       

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